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Anemia clinical trials at UC Cancer

23 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Gene Transfer Study Inducing Fetal Hemoglobin in Sickle Cell Disease (GRASP, BMT CTN 2001)

    open to eligible people ages 13-40

    A promising approach for the treatment of genetic diseases is called gene therapy. Gene therapy is a relatively new field of medicine in which genetic material (mostly DNA) in the patient is changed to treat his or her own disease. In gene therapy, we introduce new genetic material in order to fix or replace the patient's disease gene, with the goal of curing the disease. The procedure is similar to a bone marrow transplant, in that the patient's malfunctioning blood stem cells are reduced or eliminated using chemotherapy, but it is different because instead of using a different person's (donor) blood stem cells for the transplant, the patient's own blood stem cells are given back after the new genetic material has been introduced into those cells. This approach has the advantage of eliminating any risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD), reducing the risk of graft rejection, and may also allow less chemotherapy to be utilized for the conditioning portion of the transplant procedure. To introduce new genetic material into the patient's own blood stem cells we use a modified version of a virus (called a 'vector') that efficiently inserts the "correcting" genetic material into the cells. The vector is a specialized biological medicine that has been formulated for use in human beings. Fetal hemoglobin (HbF) is a healthy, non-sickling kind of hemoglobin. The investigators have discovered a gene that is very important in controlling the amount of HbF. Decreasing the expression of this gene in sickle cell patients could increase the amount of fetal hemoglobin while simultaneously reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in their blood, specifically the amount in red blood cells where sickle hemoglobin causes damage to the cell, and therefore potentially cure or significantly improve the condition. The gene we are targeting for change in this study that controls the level of fetal hemoglobin is called BCL11A. In summary, the advantages of a gene therapy approach include: 1) it can be used even if the patient does not have a matched donor available; 2) it may allow a reduction in the amount of chemotherapy required to prepare the patient for the transplant; and 3) it will avoid certain strong medicines often required to prevent and treat GVHD and rejection. Our lab studies with normal mice, mice that have a form of SCD, and with cells from the bone marrow of SCD patients who have donated bone marrow for research purposes show this approach is very effective in reducing the amount of sickle hemoglobin in red cells. Our pilot trial testing this approach in 10 patients with SCD has shown that the treatment has not caused any unexpected safety problems, and that it increases HbF within the red blood cells. Our goal is to continue to test whether this approach is safe, and whether using gene therapy to change the expression of BCL11A will lead to decreased episodes of vaso-occlusive crisis pain in people with SCD.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • A Study of a Single Dose of Inclacumab to Reduce Re-admission in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease and Recurrent Vaso-occlusive Crises

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This Phase 3 study will assess the safety and efficacy of a single dose of inclacumab, a P-selectin inhibitor, for a vaso-occlusive crisis (VOC) after an index VOC in participants with sickle cell disease (SCD). Participants will be randomized to receive either inclacumab or placebo.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Dose Confirmation and Safety of Experimental Crizanlizumab for Pediatric Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 17 years

    The purpose of the Phase 2 CSEG101B2201 study is to confirm and to establish appropriate dosing and to evaluate the safety in pediatric participants ages 6 months to <18 years with a history of VOC with or without HU/HC, receiving crizanlizumab for 2 years. The efficacy and safety of crizanlizumab was already demonstrated in adults with sickle cell disease. The approach is to extrapolate from the PK/pharmacodynamics (PD) already established in the adult population. The study is designed as a Phase II, multicenter, open-label study.

    at UC Davis

  • A Study of Etavopivat in Patients With Thalassemia or Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2 study that will evaluate the safety and clinical activity of etavopivat in patients with thalassemia or sickle cell disease and test how well etavopivat works to lower the number of red blood cell transfusions required and increase hemoglobin.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • A Study of the Safety and Effectiveness of Experimental BIVV003 for Stem Cell Transplant for Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-40

    This is an open label, multicenter, Phase 1/2 study in approximately eight adults with severe Sickle Cell Disease (SCD). The study will evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of autologous hematopoietic stem cell transplantation using BIVV003.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • A Study to Assess the Safety and Efficacy of Inclacumab in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease Experiencing Vaso-occlusive Crises

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This Phase 3 study will assess the safety and efficacy of inclacumab, a P-selectin inhibitor, in reducing the frequency of vaso-occlusive crises (VOCs) in approximately 240 adult and adolescent participants (≥ 12 years of age) with sickle cell disease (SCD). Participants will be randomized to receive inclacumab or placebo.

    at UC Irvine UCSF

  • A Study to Assess the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, and Pharmacodynamics of AG-946 in Healthy Volunteers and in Participants With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    The purpose of the study is to assess the safety and tolerability of AG-946 in healthy volunteers after oral administration of single ascending doses (SAD) and multiple ascending doses (MAD) of AG-946 over 14 or up to 28 days of dosing, and to identify a range of doses that are safe and pharmacologically active in participants with sickle cell disease. The SAD and MAD parts of the study will be randomized and double-blinded, and will assess the safety, pharmacokinetics (PK), and pharmacodynamics (PD) of AG-946 as well as the effect of food (SAD only) on the pharmacokinetics (PK) of AG-946. The sickle cell disease (SCD) part of the study will be non-randomized and open-label, and is designed to identify 1 or more safe and tolerable dose(s) of AG-946 with potential activity in the treatment of participants with sickle cell disease (SCD).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Are you an adult or adolescent with Sickle Cell Disease? The HIBISCUS Study is testing a new investigational treatment!

    “We are looking for people age 12 to 65 years old with SCD to help test a drug trying to reduce the number of vaso-occlusive crises”

    open to eligible people ages 12-65

    This clinical trial is a Phase 2/3 study that will evaluate the efficacy and safety of etavopivat and test how well etavopivat works compared to placebo to improve the amount of hemoglobin in the blood and to reduce the number of vaso-occlusive crises (times when the blood vessels become blocked and cause pain).

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSF

  • EDIT-301 for Autologous HSCT in Subjects With Severe Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-50

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy, safety and tolerability of treatment with EDIT-301 in adult subjects with severe sickle cell disease (SCD).

    at UCSF

  • Exercise in Child Health

    open to eligible people ages 10-17

    This study is a cooperative investigation funded by the NIH. The project is a collaboration among three major NIH Clinical Translational Science Awardees: 1) UCI (lead site with its affiliate CHOC), 2) Northwestern University (with its affiliate Lurie Children's Hospital), and 3) USC (with its affiliate Children's Hospital of Los Angeles). There is an increasing number of children who, through medical advances, now survive diseases and conditions that were once fatal, but which remain chronic and debilitating. A major challenge to improve both the immediate and long term care and health of such children has been the gap in our understanding of how to assess the biological effects of exercise. Like otherwise healthy children, children with chronic diseases and disabilities want to be physically active. The challenge is to determine what constitutes safe and beneficial level of physical activity when the underlying disease or condition [e.g., cystic fibrosis (CF) or sickle cell disease (SCD)] imposes physiological constraints on exercise that are not present in otherwise healthy children. Current exercise testing protocols were based on studies of athletes and high performing healthy individuals and were designed to test limits of performance at very high-intensity, unphysiological, maximal effort. These approaches are not optimal for children and adolescents with disease and disability. This project (REACH-Revamping Exercise Assessment in Child Health) is designed to address this gap. Cohorts of children will be identified with two major genetic diseases (CF and SCD) and measure exercise responses annually as they progress from early puberty to mid or late puberty over a 3-4year period. In addition, in the light of the pandemic, a group of children will be added who were affected by SARS-CoV-2 and investigate their responses to exercise. SARS-CoV-2 has similar long-term symptoms than CF and SCD have. Novel approaches to assessing physiological responses to exercise using advanced data analytics will be examined in relation to metrics of habitual physical activity, circulating biomarkers of inflammation and growth, leukocyte gene expression, and the impact of the underlying CF, SCD or SARS-CoV-2 condition. The data from this study will help to develop a toolkit of innovative metrics for exercise testing that will be made available to the research and clinical community.

    at UC Irvine

  • GBT021601-021: A Study in Adult and Pediatric Participants With SCD

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 65 years

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, efficacy, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of GBT021601.

    at UCLA

  • Myeloablative Conditioning, Prophylactic Defibrotide and Haplo AlloSCT for Patients With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 34 years

    This is a follow-up trial to NYMC 526 (NCT01461837) to assess the safety, efficacy and toxicity of administering Defibrotide prophylaxis for high-risk sickle cell or beta thalassemia patients undergoing a familial haploidentical allogeneic stem cell transplantation with CD34 enrichment and T-cell addback. This patient population historically has a risk of developing sinusoidal obstructive syndrome (SOS) and Defibrotide has demonstrated efficacy in treatment of SOS. The Funding Source is FDA OOPD.

    at UCLA

  • Shared-Decision Making for Hydroxyurea

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 5 years

    The goal of the study is to understand how best to help parents of young children with sickle cell disease and their clinicians have a shared discussion about hydroxyurea (one that takes into account medical evidence and parent values and preferences). The study will compare two methods to help clinicians facilitate this-a clinician pocket guide and a clinician hydroxyurea shared decision making toolkit-in a group of parents of children ages 0-5 with sickle cell disease. The investigators hope that both methods lead to parents reaching a high-quality, well-informed decision. In addition, the team hopes to demonstrate that parents who experience a shared decision will have lower anxiety and decisional uncertainty. The researchers also expect these parents to be more likely to choose hydroxyurea and that their children will have less pain, fewer hospitalizations, better developmental outcomes, and higher quality of life. The project team hopes to show that the toolkit method is easy for clinicians to use and gives parents the support needed to make an informed decision.

    at UCSF

  • Sickle Cell Disease and CardiovAscular Risk - Red Cell Exchange Trial (SCD-CARRE)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The SCD-CARRE trial is a Phase 3, prospective, randomized, multicenter, controlled, parallel two-arm study aimed to determine if automated exchange blood transfusion and standard of care administered to high mortality risk adult SCD patients reduces the total number of episodes of clinical worsening of SCD requiring acute health care encounters (non-elective infusion center/ER/hospital visits) or resulting in death over 12 months as compared with standard of care.

    at UCSF

  • Sickle Cell Disease Treatment With Arginine Therapy (STArT) Trial

    open to eligible people ages 3-21

    The trial of IV arginine therapy in children with Vaso-occlusive painful episodes (VOE) in sickle cell disease (SCD) is designed to further knowledge on efficacy and safety of the therapy.

    at UCSF

  • Stem Cell Gene Therapy for Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This Phase I clinical trial will assess the safety and initial evidence for efficacy of an autologous transplant of lentiviral vector modified peripheral blood for adults with severe sickle cell disease.

    at UCLA

  • Study to Evaluate the Efficacy & Safety of the INTERCEPT Blood System for RBCs in Complex Cardiac Surgery Patients

    open to eligible people ages 11 years and up

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of RBC transfusion for support of acute anemia in cardiovascular surgery patients based on the clinical outcome of renal impairment following transfusion of red blood cells (RBCs) treated with the INTERCEPT Blood System (IBS) for Red Blood Cells compared to patients transfused with conventional RBCs.

    at UCLA

  • The BENeFiTS Trial in Beta Thalassemia Intermedia

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Beta-thalassemias and hemoglobinopathies are serious inherited blood diseases caused by abnormal or deficiency of beta A chains of hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells which delivers oxygen throughout the body.The diseases are characterized by hemolytic anemia, organ damage, and early mortality without treatment. Increases in another type of (normal) hemoglobin, fetal globin (HbF), which is normally silenced in infancy, reduces anemia and morbidity. Even incremental augmentation of fetal globin is established to reduce red blood cell pathology, anemia, certain complications, and to improve survival. This trial will evaluate an oral drug discovered in a high throughput screen, which increases fetal globin protein (HbF and red blood cells expressing HbF)and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) to high levels in anemic nonhuman primates and in transgenic mice. The study drug acts by suppressing 4 repressors of the fetal globin gene promoter in progenitor cells from patients. The drug has been used for 50 years in a combination product for different actions - to enhance half-life and reduce side effects of a different active drug- and is considered safe for long-term use. This trial will first evaluate 3 dose levels in small cohorts of nontransfused patients with beta thalassemia intermedia. The most active dose will then be evaluated in larger subject groups with beta thalassemia and other hemoglobinopathies, such as sickle cell disease.

    at UCSF

  • Treosulfan-Based Conditioning Regimen Before a Blood or Bone Marrow Transplant for the Treatment of Bone Marrow Failure Diseases (BMT CTN 1904)

    open to eligible people ages 1-49

    This phase II trial tests whether treosulfan, fludarabine, and rabbit antithymocyte globulin (rATG) work when given before a blood or bone marrow transplant (conditioning regimen) to cause fewer complications for patients with bone marrow failure diseases. Chemotherapy drugs, such as treosulfan, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Fludarabine may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. rATG is used to decrease the body's immune response and may improve bone marrow function and increase blood cell counts. Adding treosulfan to a conditioning regimen with fludarabine and rATG may result in patients having less severe complications after a blood or bone marrow transplant.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • A Multicenter Access and Distribution Protocol for Unlicensed Cryopreserved Cord Blood Units (CBUs)

    “Assessing new blood cells growth after transplant using cord blood units that do not meet FDA guidelines but meet NMDP guidelines”

    open to all eligible people

    This study is an access and distribution protocol for unlicensed cryopreserved cord blood units (CBUs) in pediatric and adult patients with hematologic malignancies and other indications.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Bone Pain in Adults With Sickle Cell Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    A prospective study to determine how low bone mineral density and/or vertebral compression fractures associate with pain in adults with sickle cell disease

    at UC Davis

  • Red Blood Cell - IMProving trAnsfusions for Chronically Transfused Recipients

    open to all eligible people

    Red Blood Cell - IMProving trAnsfusions for Chronically Transfused recipients (RBC-IMPACT) is an observational cohort study to assess donor, component, and recipient factors that contribute to RBC efficacy in chronically and episodically transfused patients. The objective of the study is to determine how specific genetic and non-genetic factors in donors and recipients may impact RBC survival after transfusion - in short, what factors on both the donor and recipient side may improve the efficacy of the transfusion.

    at UCSF

  • STRIDE Biorepository

    open to eligible people ages 15-40

    The STRIDE Biorepository is an optional substudy available to participants in "Bone Marrow Transplantation vs Standard of Care in Patients with Severe Sickle Cell Disease (BMT CTN 1503) (STRIDE)".

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Anemia research studies include .

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