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Brain Tumor clinical trials at UC Cancer

12 research studies open to eligible people

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  • A Study of Radiation Therapy With Temozolomide Versus Radiation Therapy With PCV Chemotherapy in Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells or by stopping them from dividing. It is not yet known whether giving radiation with concomitant and adjuvant temozolomide versus radiation with adjuvant PCV is more effective in treating anaplastic glioma or low grade glioma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • APL-101 Study of Subjects With NSCLC With c-Met EXON 14 Skip Mutations and c-Met Dysregulation Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The primary Phase 1 purpose of this study was to assess overall safety, tolerability and recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of APL-101. The Phase 2 portion will assess efficacy of the dose determined in Phase 1 in individuals with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer with c-Met EXON 14 Skip Mutations; individuals with cancers associated with c-Met amplifications; individuals with cancers associated with c-Met fusion

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Clinical Benefit of Using Molecular Profiling to Determine an Individualized Treatment Plan for Patients With High Grade Glioma

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This is a 2 strata pilot trial within the Pacific Pediatric Neuro-Oncology Consortium (PNOC). The study will use a new treatment approach based on each patient's tumor gene expression, whole-exome sequencing (WES), targeted panel profile (UCSF 500 gene panel), and RNA-Seq. The current study will test the efficacy of such an approach in children with High-grade gliomas HGG.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Fimepinostat in Treating Brain Tumors in Children and Young Adults

    open to eligible people ages 3-39

    This trial studies how well fimepinostat works in treating patients with newly diagnosed diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma, or medulloblastoma, or high-grade glioma that have come back. Fimepinostat may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Laser Ablation of Abnormal Neurological Tissue Using Robotic NeuroBlate System

    open to all eligible people

    The NeuroBlate® System (NBS) is a minimally invasive robotic laser thermotherapy tool that is being manufactured by Monteris Medical. Since it received FDA clearance in May 2009, the NBS has been used in over 2600 procedures conducted at over 70 leading institutions across United States. This is a prospective, multi-center registry that will include data collection up to 5 years to evaluate safety, QoL, and procedural outcomes including local control failure rate, progression free survival, overall survival, and seizure freedom in up to 1,000 patients and up to 50 sites.

    at UCSD

  • Long-Term Follow-Up of Patients Who Have Participated in Children's Oncology Group Studies

    open to all eligible people

    This clinical trial keeps track of and collects follow-up information from patients who are currently enrolled on or have participated in a Children's Oncology Group study. Developing a way to keep track of patients who have participated in Children's Oncology Group studies may allow doctors learn more about the long-term effects of cancer treatment and help them reduce problems related to treatment and improve patient quality of life.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Magrolimab in Children and Adults With Recurrent or Progressive Malignant Brain Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 3 years and up

    Children and adults with recurrent or progressive malignant brain tumors have a dismal prognosis, and outcomes remain very poor. Magrolimab is a first-in-class anticancer therapeutic agent targeting the Cluster of differentiation 47 (CD47)-signal receptor protein-alpha (SIRP-alpha) axis. Binding of magrolimab to human CD47 on target malignant cells blocks the "don't eat me" signal to macrophages and enhances tumor cell phagocytosis. Pre-clinical studies have shown that treatment with magrolimab leads to prolonged survival in models of Atypical Teratoid Rhabdoid Tumors (ATRT), diffuse intrinsic pontine glioma (DIPG), high-grade glioma (adult and pediatric), medulloblastoma, and embryonal tumors formerly called Primitive Neuro-Ectodermal Tumors (PNET). Safety studies in humans have proven that magrolimab has an excellent safety profile. Ongoing studies are currently testing magrolimab in adult myelodysplastic syndromes, acute myeloid leukemia, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, colorectal, ovarian, and bladder cancers. Herein we propose to test the safety of magrolimab in children and adults with recurrent or progressive malignant brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Phase 1 Study of the Dual MDM2/MDMX Inhibitor ALRN-6924 in Pediatric Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This research study is studying a novel drug called ALRN-6924 as a possible treatment for resistant (refractory) solid tumor, brain tumor, lymphoma or leukemia. The drugs involved in this study are: - ALRN-6924 - Cytarabine (for patients with leukemia only)

    at UCSF

  • Prospective Exploratory Study of FAPi PET/CT With Histopathology Validation in Patients With Various Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This exploratory study investigates how an imaging technique called 68Ga-FAPi-46 PET/CT can determine where and to which degree the FAPI tracer (68Ga-FAPi-46) accumulates in normal and cancer tissues in patients with cancer. Because some cancers take up 68Ga-FAPi-46 it can be seen with PET. FAP stands for Fibroblast Activation Protein. FAP is produced by cells that surround tumors (cancer associated fibroblasts). The function of FAP is not well understood but imaging studies have shown that FAP can be detected with FAPI PET/CT. Imaging FAP with FAPI PET/CT may in the future provide additional information about various cancers.

    at UCLA

  • Simultaneous Multinuclear Metabolic MRI in Newly Diagnosed or Recurrent Glioma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial constructs and tests a novel multinuclear metabolic magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequence in patients with glioma (brain tumor) that is newly diagnosed or has come back (recurrent). This trial aims to develop new diagnostic imaging technology that may bridge gaps between early detection and diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment in brain cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Trial of CUDC-907 in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, or Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This research study is evaluating a novel drug called CUDC-907 as a possible treatment for resistant (refractory) pediatric solid tumors (including neuroblastoma), lymphoma, or brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Use of a Tonometer to Identify Epileptogenic Lesions During Pediatric Epilepsy Surgery

    open to all eligible people

    Refractory epilepsy, meaning epilepsy that no longer responds to medication, is a common neurosurgical indication in children. In such cases, surgery is the treatment of choice. Complete resection of affected brain tissue is associated with highest probability of seizure freedom. However, epileptogenic brain tissue is visually identical to normal brain tissue, complicating complete resection. Modern investigative methods are of limited use. An important subjective assessment during surgery is that affected brain tissue feels stiffer, however there is presently no way to determine this without committing to resecting the affected area. It is hypothesized that intra-operative use of a tonometer (Diaton) will identify abnormal brain tissue stiffness in affected brain relative to normal brain. This will help identify stiffer brain regions without having to resect them. The objective is to determine if intra-operative use of a tonometer to measure brain tissue stiffness will offer additional precision in identifying epileptogenic lesions. In participants with refractory epilepsy, various locations on the cerebral cortex will be identified using standard pre-operative investigations like magnetic resonance imagin (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET). These are areas of presumed normal and abnormal brain where the tonometer will be used during surgery to measure brain tissue stiffness. Brain tissue stiffness measurements will then be compared with results of routine pre-operative and intra-operative tests. Such comparisons will help determine if and to what extent intra-operative brain tissue stiffness measurements correlate with other tests and help identify epileptogenic brain tissue. 24 participants have already undergone intra-operative brain tonometry. Results in these participants are encouraging: abnormally high brain tissue stiffness measurements have consistently been identified and significantly associated with abnormal brain tissue. If the tonometer adequately identifies epileptogenic brain tissue through brain tissue stiffness measurements, it is possible that resection of identified tissue could lead to better post-operative outcomes, lowering seizure recurrences and neurological deficits.

    at UCLA

Our lead scientists for Brain Tumor research studies include .

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