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BRCA 1 Gene Mutation clinical trials at UC Cancer

4 research studies open to eligible people

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  • A Study of the Experimental Medicine Niraparib for Men With High Risk Prostate Cancer

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well niraparib, when given before surgery, works in treating patients with high risk prostate cancer that has not spread to other parts of the body (localized) and alterations in deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) repair pathways. Niraparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis

  • A Study to Compare Two Surgical Procedures in Women With BRCA1 Mutations to Assess Reduced Risk of Ovarian Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 35-50

    This trial studies how well two surgical procedures (bilateral salpingectomy and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy) work in reducing the risk of ovarian cancer for women with BRCA1 mutations. Bilateral salpingectomy involves the surgical removal of fallopian tubes, and bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy involves the surgical removal of both the fallopian tubes and ovaries. This study may help doctors determine if the two surgical procedures are nearly the same for ovarian cancer risk reduction for women with BRCA1 mutations.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Study of CX-5461 in Patients With Solid Tumours and BRCA1/2, PALB2 or Homologous Recombination Deficiency (HRD) Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multi-center, phase 1b study designed to determine a tolerable dose of CX-5461 administered by IV infusion on Day 1 and Day 8 of a 28-day cycle in patients with selected solid tumours and associated mutations for future Phase II trials. The safety and tolerability of CX-5461, preliminary evidence of antitumor effect and the effect of CX-5461 on the Health-Related Quality of Life (HRQoL) will also be evaluated. The study will also evaluate the predictive value of mutational signatures and explore the significance of dynamic changes in ctDNA levels and plasma DNA methylome profiling in this study's exploratory cohort.

    at UCLA

  • Testing the Addition of Pembrolizumab, an Immunotherapy Cancer Drug to Olaparib Alone as Therapy for Patients With Pancreatic Cancer That Has Spread With Inherited BRCA Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies whether adding pembrolizumab to olaparib (standard of care) works better than olaparib alone in treating patients with pancreatic cancer with germline BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic). BRCA1 and BRCA2 are human genes that produce tumor suppressor proteins. These proteins help repair damaged deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) and, therefore, play a role in ensuring the stability of each cell's genetic material. When either of these genes is mutated, or altered, such that its protein product is not made or does not function correctly, DNA damage may not be repaired properly. As a result, cells are more likely to develop additional genetic alterations that can lead to some types of cancer, including pancreatic cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Olaparib is an inhibitor of PARP, a protein that helps repair damaged DNA. Blocking PARP may help keep tumor cells from repairing their damaged DNA, causing them to die. PARP inhibitors are a type of targeted therapy. The addition of pembrolizumab to the usual treatment of olaparib may help to shrink tumors in patients with metastatic pancreatic cancer with BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutations.

    at UC Irvine

Our lead scientists for BRCA 1 Gene Mutation research studies include .

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