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CD20 Positive clinical trials at UC Cancer

2 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Modified Immune Cells (CD19/CD20 CAR-T Cells) in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Refractory B-Cell Lymphoma or Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of CD19/CD20 chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) T-cells when given together with chemotherapy, and to see how effective they are in treating patients with non-Hodgkin's B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia that has come back (recurrent) or has not responded to treatment (refractory). In CAR-T cell therapy, a patient's white blood cells (T cells) are changed in the laboratory to produce an engineered receptor that allows the T cell to recognize and respond to CD19 and CD20 proteins. CD19 and CD20 are commonly found on non-Hodgkin?s B-cell lymphoma and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells. Chemotherapy drugs such as fludarabine phosphate and cyclophosphamide can control cancer cells by killing them, by preventing their growth, or by stopping them from spreading. Combining CD19/CD20 CAR-T cells and chemotherapy may help treat patients with recurrent or refractory B-cell lymphoma or chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    at UCLA

  • Rituximab With or Without Stem Cell Transplant in Treating Patients With Minimal Residual Disease-Negative Mantle Cell Lymphoma in First Complete Remission

    open to eligible people ages 18-70

    This randomized phase III trial studies rituximab after stem cell transplant and to see how well it works compared with rituximab alone in treating patients with in minimal residual disease-negative mantle cell lymphoma in first complete remission. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Giving chemotherapy before a stem cell transplant helps kill any cancer cells that are in the body and helps make room in the patient's bone marrow for new blood-forming cells (stem cells) to grow. After treatment, stem cells are collected from the patient's blood and stored. More chemotherapy is then given to prepare the bone marrow for the stem cell transplant. The stem cells are then returned to the patient to replace the blood-forming cells that were destroyed by the chemotherapy. Giving rituximab with or without stem cell transplant may work better in treating patients with mantle cell lymphoma.

    at UCSD UCSF

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