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Colorectal Cancer clinical trials at UC Cancer
44 research studies open to new patients

  • A Safety Study of Talimogene Laherparepvec Combined With Atezolizumab for Triple Negative Breast Cancer and Colorectal Cancer With Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18-99

    Approximately 36 subjects will be enrolled in this study. The locations of the study will be in the United States, Australia, Europe and Switzerland. The goal of this study is to evaluate the safety of intrahepatic injection (directly into the liver) of talimogene laherparepvec in combination with intravenously administered atezolizumab in subjects with triple negative breast cancer and colorectal cancer with liver metastases.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of AbGn-107 in Patients With Gastric, Colorectal, Pancreatic or Biliary Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is to define the safety profile and to determine the Maximal tolerated dose regimen and preliminary efficacy of AbGn-107 administered every 14 days (Q2W regimen) or 28 days (Q4W regimen) in patients with chemo-refractory locally advanced, recurrent or metastatic gastric, colorectal, pancreatic or biliary cancer.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Napabucasin (BBI-608) in Combination With FOLFIRI in Adult Patients With Previously Treated Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an international multi-center, prospective, open-label, randomized, adaptive design phase 3 trial of the cancer stem cell pathway inhibitor napabucasin plus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI versus standard bi-weekly FOLFIRI in patients with previously treated metastatic colorectal cancer (CRC).

    at UCLA UCSD

  • A Study of PDR001 in Combination With LCL161, Everolimus or Panobinostat

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to combine the PDR001 checkpoint inhibitor with several agents with immunomodulatory activity to identify the doses and schedule for combination therapy and to preliminarily assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacological and clinical activity of these combinations.

    at UCLA

  • A Study of RO7198457 (Personalized Cancer Vaccine [PCV]) as a Single Agent and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Participants With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1a/1b, open-label, multicenter, global, dose-escalation study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, immune response, and pharmacokinetics of RO7198457 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab (MPDL3280A, an engineered anti-programmed death-ligand 1 [anti-PD-L1] antibody).

    at UCSF

  • A Study of XmAb®20717 in Subjects With Selected Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, multiple dose, ascending dose escalation study to define a MTD/RD and regimen of XmAb20717, to describe safety and tolerability, to assess PK and immunogenicity, and to preliminarily assess anti-tumor activity of XmAb20717 in subjects with selected advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD

  • A Study to Evaluate Ibrutinib Combination Therapy in Patients With Selected Gastrointestinal and Genitourinary Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of the combination treatment of ibrutinib with everolimus, paclitaxel, docetaxel, or cetuximab in selected advanced gastrointestinal and genitourinary tumors.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • An Investigational Immuno-therapy Study Of Nivolumab In Combination With Trametinib With Or Without Ipilimumab In Patients With Previously Treated Cancer of the Colon or Rectum That Has Spread

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to investigate treatment with Nivolumab in combination with Trametinib with or without Ipilimumab in patients with previously treated cancer of the colon or rectum that has spread.

    at UCSF

  • Anal Cytology Collection Procedures in Predicting High-Grade Anal Dysplasia in Men Who Have Sex With Men

    open to eligible males ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial compares three anal cytology collection procedures (collected at a single visit) in men who have sex with men (MSM). It also compares two different tests for human papilloma virus, the virus that causes high grade anal dysplasia, which is thought to occur before anal cancer. This study may help doctors develop better screening for high-grade anal dysplasia in MSM in order to identify those who need to return for additional screening and treatment.

    at UCLA

  • Basket Study of Entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the Treatment of Patients With Solid Tumors Harboring NTRK 1/2/3 (Trk A/B/C), ROS1, or ALK Gene Rearrangements (Fusions)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, global Phase 2 basket study of entrectinib (RXDX-101) for the treatment of patients with solid tumors that harbor an NTRK1/2/3, ROS1, or ALK gene fusion. Patients will be assigned to different baskets according to tumor type and gene fusion.

    at UCSF UCSD UC Irvine

  • Cancer Associated Thrombosis and Isoquercetin (CAT IQ)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This research study is evaluating a drug called isoquercetin to prevent venous thrombosis (blood clots), in participants who have pancreas, non small cell lung cancer or colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Collecting and Studying Tissue Samples From Patients With HIV-Associated Malignancies

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    RATIONALE: Collecting and studying tissue samples from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    PURPOSE: This research trial studies collecting tissue samples from patients with HIV-related malignancies.

    at UCSD UCLA

  • Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Stage III Colon Cancer and Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies combination chemotherapy and atezolizumab to see how well it works compared with combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with stage III colon cancer and deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair. Drugs used in combination chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, leucovorin calcium, and fluorouracil, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy with atezolizumab may work better than combination chemotherapy alone in treating patients with colon cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Combination Chemotherapy, Bevacizumab, and/or Atezolizumab in Treating Patients With Deficient DNA Mismatch Repair Metastatic Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial studies how well combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and/or atezolizumab work in treating patients with deficient deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) mismatch repair colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and leucovorin calcium, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as bevacizumab and atezolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving combination chemotherapy, bevacizumab, and atezolizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Combination of TATE and PD-1 Inhibitor in Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18-80

    This is a single center, open-label phase IIA study that investigates the preliminary efficacy of Trans-arterial Tirapazamine Embolization (TATE) treatment of liver cancer followed by a PD-1 checkpoint inhibitor (either nivolumab or pembrolizumab). Patients with four types of cancers will be enrolled, hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC), metastatic gastric cancer and advanced non-small cell lung cancer. All enrolled patients need to have liver lesions.

    at UC Irvine

  • DS-8201a in Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor2 (HER2)-Expressing Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The main objective of this study is to test the safety and effectiveness of DS-8201a for participants with HER2-expressing advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Durvalumab and tremelimumab with/without high/low-dose radiation therapy to treat metastatic colorectal and lung cancer

    “Does giving immunotherapy with radiation therapy work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies the side effects of durvalumab and tremelimumab and to see how well they work with or without high or low-dose radiation therapy in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer that has spread to other parts of the body. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving durvalumab and tremelimumab with radiation therapy may work better in treating patients with colorectal or non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Efficacy and Safety Study of Tisotumab Vedotin for Patients With Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will study tisotumab vedotin to find out whether it is an effective treatment for certain solid tumors and what side effects (unwanted effects) may occur. The treatment will be given to patients every three weeks.

    at UC Davis

  • Experimental Medicine (Transuzumab and Pertuzunab) in Advanced Colorectal Cancer with Genetic Component

    “Help us examine how well experimental drugs work compared to standard-use drugs in treating colorectal cancer.”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well trastuzumab and pertuzumab work compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with HER2/neu amplified colorectal cancer that has spread from where it started to other places in the body and cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as trastuzumab and pertuzumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving trastuzumab and pertuzumab may work better compared to cetuximab and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Experimental medicine in Treating Patients With HIV-Associated Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may block tumor growth in different ways by targeting certain cells. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD UC Davis

  • Experimental Radiotracer Imaging Study for Cancer Patients

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the side effects of 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide and how well it works in imaging patients with primary or cancer that has spread to the breast, colorectal, lung, or pancreatic. Radiotracers, such as 18F-alphavbeta6-binding-peptide, may improve the ability to locate cancer in the body.

    at UC Davis

  • Expressing Personalized Tumor Antigens Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1, open-label, uncontrolled, multicenter study in 3 distinct solid tumors. The study design is dose-escalation/de-escalation using a standard 3 + 3 design to evaluate the safety profile of ADXS-NEO, to select a recommended phase 2 dose (RP2D), and identify initial signs of clinical activity in each of the 3 tumor-specific cohorts.

    at UCLA

  • Longitudinal Performance of Epi proColon

    open to eligible people ages 50-74

    This study will evaluate longitudinal performance of Epi proColon with respect to test positivity, longitudinal adherence to Epi proColon screening, adherence to follow-up colonoscopy and diagnostic yield, as well as assay failure rates.

    at UCSD

  • Multicenter Phase II Study of Transanal TME (taTME)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • Nivolumab After Combined Modality Therapy in Treating Patients With High Risk Stage II-IIIB Anal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II clinical trial studies how well nivolumab after combined modality therapy works in treating patients with high risk stage II-IIIB anal cancer. Monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Oxaliplatin Microdosing Assay in Predicting Exposure and Sensitivity to Oxaliplatin-Based Chemotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well carbon C 14 oxaliplatin microdosing assay works in predicting exposure and sensitivity to oxaliplatin-based chemotherapy in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body and usually cannot be cured or controlled with treatment. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as oxaliplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Carbon C 14 is a radioactive form of carbon, exists in nature and in the body at a low level. Microdose carbon C 14 oxaliplatin diagnostic assay may help doctors understand how well patients respond to treatment and develop individualize oxaliplatin dosing in patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UC Davis

  • Patient-Centered Risk Adjusted Surveillance After Curative Resection of Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 21 years and up

    The long-term goal of this research is to develop new tools to guide patients, caregivers, and clinicians in making individualized decisions regarding colorectal cancer (CRC) surveillance. As part of a Patient-Centered Outcomes Research Institute-funded contract, investigator will analyze surveillance data to determine the effectiveness of CRC surveillance and recurrence risk taking into account different patient and tumor characteristics; identify key issues about CRC surveillance important to patients, caregivers, and clinicians; and integrate the recurrence risk and patient priorities into a patient-centered, risk stratified surveillance strategy by creating an interactive decision aid for use by patients and clinicians. This protocol addresses a formative step in the creation of the interactive decision aid where patients' information needs and preferences are assessed regarding decisions about surveillance. The specific aims of this protocol are: Phase 1 - To interview patients and their caregivers to determine their concerns, preferences and key priorities regarding surveillance after curative resection of colorectal cancer, and Phase 2 - To refine the key priorities identified in phase 1 through focus groups and surveys with patients and caregivers.

    at UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab Combined With Itacitinib (INCB039110) and/or Pembrolizumab Combined With INCB050465 in Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is an open-label, multicenter, Phase 1b platform study in subjects with advanced or metastatic solid tumors (Part 1a) and subjects with selected solid tumors (Part 1b and Part 2). Two treatment groups (Group A and Group B) will be evaluated Part 1a utilizes a 3+3 design to evaluate pembrolizumab and INCB combinations in advanced solid tumors. Group A will evaluate a JAK inhibitor with JAK1 selectivity itacitinib (INCB039110) in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475) and Group B will evaluate a PI3K-delta inhibitor (INCB050465) in combination with pembrolizumab to determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) or PAD and recommend a dose for the Part 1b safety expansion with each combination. Once the recommended dose has been identified in Part 1a, subjects with select solid tumor types will be enrolled into safety expansion cohorts based upon prior treatment history with a PD-1 pathway-targeted agent (Part 1b) for each combination. Part 2 utilizes a Simon 2-Stage design to evaluate INCB050465 in combination with pembrolizumab in patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC) and a 1 stage design to evaluate the combination in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and urothelial cancer (UC).

    at UCSF

  • Pembrolizumab, Capecitabine, and Bevacizumab in Treating Patients With Microsatellite Stable Colorectal Cancer That Is Locally Advanced, Metastatic, or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the side effects and best dose of capecitabine when given together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, and to see how well they work in treating patients with microsatellite stable colorectal cancer that has spread to nearby tissues or lymph nodes, has spread to other places in the body, or that cannot be removed by surgery. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab and bevacizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving capecitabine together with pembrolizumab and bevacizumab may work better in treating patients with colorectal cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Phase 1 Study of the Highly-selective RET Inhibitor BLU-667 in Patients With Thyroid Cancer, Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer, and Other Advanced Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK), pharmacodynamics (PD), and preliminary antineoplastic activity of BLU-667 administered orally in patients with medullary thyroid cancer, RET-altered NSCLC and other RET-altered solid tumors.

    at UC Irvine

  • Phase 1/1b Study to Evaluate the Safety and Tolerability of CPI-444 Alone and in Combination With Atezolizumab in Advanced Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase 1/1b open-label, multicenter, dose-selection study of CPI-444, an oral small molecule targeting the adenosine-A2A receptor on T-lymphocytes and other cells of the immune system. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, and anti-tumor activity of CPI-444 as a single agent and in combination with atezolizumab, a PD-L1 inhibitor against various solid tumors. CPI-444 blocks adenosine from binding to the A2A receptor. Adenosine suppresses the anti-tumor activity of T cells and other immune cells.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-195 in Patients With Previously Treated NTRK Fusion Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 1 month and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, multi-center, open-label study designed to evaluate the safety and efficacy of LOXO-195 when administered orally to patients age ≥ 1 month and older with NTRK fusion cancers treated with a prior TRK inhibitor.

    at UCLA

  • Phase 1/2 Study of LOXO-292 in Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, RET Fusion-Positive Solid Tumors, and Medullary Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This is a Phase 1/2, open-label, first-in-human study designed to evaluate the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics (PK) and preliminary anti-tumor activity of LOXO-292 administered orally to patients with advanced solid tumors, including RET-fusion-positive solid tumors, medullary thyroid cancer (MTC) and other tumors with RET activation.

    at UCLA UCSF UCSD UC Irvine

  • Phase I Study of Enadenotucirev and PD-1 Inhibitor in Subjects With Metastatic or Advanced Epithelial Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase I multicenter, open label, nonrandomized study of enadenotucirev administered in combination with nivolumab in subjects with metastatic or advanced epithelial tumors (with focus on CRC, UCC, SCCHN and salivary gland cancer) not responding to standard therapy.

    at UCLA

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Self-monitoring and Reminder Texts to Increase Physical Activity After Cancer II

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    There is a critical need for physical activity interventions in CRC. The investigators have developed a digital health physical activity intervention, Smart Pace, which includes a wearable tracker (Fitbit) and text messaging and aims to have patients build up to 150 min/wk of moderate activity. In this study, the investigators propose to expand and improve Smart Pace, including: 1) enrolling patients during chemotherapy; 2) tailoring text messages to individual preferences and treatment timing; and 3) adding resources to support home-based exercise. The study is a 12-week pilot randomized controlled trial (RCT) to evaluate the feasibility of this novel digital health physical activity intervention among 48 CRC patients on chemotherapy. The specific aims are to: 1) Determine the feasibility of the intervention via adherence and attrition, and determine the acceptability of the intervention via questionnaires and semi-structured interviews . 2) Estimate the effect of the intervention vs. usual care on physical activity, QOL, and symptoms at 12-weeks . And 3) Explore the impact of the intervention vs. usual care on fitness, weight, waist circumference, and blood pressure at 12-weeks.

    at UCSF

  • Small Media Interventions to Increase Colorectal Cancer Screening Among Chinese Americans

    open to eligible people ages 50-75

    There have been few studies of small media interventions to promote colorectal cancer screening among Chinese Americans. Based on the results of strong preliminary studies on the promotion of colorectal cancer screening among Asian American populations, this community-academic research team propose to develop a culturally and linguistically appropriate traditional small media print brochure and a novel small media electronic audio-visual application accessible through mobile applications and through a website to promote CRC screening in English, Cantonese, and Mandarin. The team will test in a randomized controlled trial in 3 healthcare systems the efficacy of a combination of these small media interventions and a mailed patient reminder compared to usual care on increasing CRC screening among Chinese American patients.

    at UCSF

  • Study of LOXO-101 (Larotrectinib) in Subjects With NTRK Fusion Positive Solid Tumors (NAVIGATE)

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    Phase II, multi-center, open-label study of patients with advanced solid tumors harboring a fusion of NTRK1, NTRK2 or NTRK3.

    at UCLA

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    open to all eligible people

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Targeted chemotherapy, (Veliparib) and Combination Chemotherapy in Treating Patient With Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    “Does giving veliparib with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy kill more tumor cells?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well veliparib or pembrolizumab work with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced). Veliparib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as modified (m)FOLFOX6 regimen, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving veliparib or pembrolizumab with combination chemotherapy and radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells, make the tumor smaller, and reduce the amount of normal tissue that needs to be removed.

    at UCSD UC Irvine UC Davis

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Irvine UCSD UC Davis

  • Tas-102 and Radioembolization With 90Y Resin Microspheres for Chemo-refractory Colorectal Liver Metastases

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a phase I dose escalation study (3+3 design) with a dose expansion arm (12 patients) designed to evaluate safety of the combination of Tas-102 and radioembolization using Yttrium-90 (90Y) resin microspheres for patients with chemotherapy-refractory liver-dominant chemotherapy-refractory metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC).

    at UCSF

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 35 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Trial of Hu5F9-G4 in Combination With Cetuximab in Patients With Solid Tumors and Advanced Colorectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial will evaluate Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab. Hu5F9-G4 is a monoclonal antibody which is designed to block a protein called CD47, which is widely expressed on human cancer cells. Blocking CD47 with Hu5F9-G4 may enable the body's immune system to find and destroy the cancer cells. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody drug that is used for treatment of certain types of colorectal cancer as well as head and neck cancer. The major aims of the study are: (Phase 1b) to define the safety profile and to determine a recommended Phase 2 dose for Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab, and (Phase 2) to evaluate the objective response rate of Hu5F9-G4 in combination with cetuximab in patients with advanced colorectal cancer.

    at UCLA

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