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Gliosarcoma clinical trials at UC Cancer

4 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • DSC-MRI in Measuring Relative Cerebral Blood Volume for Early Response to Bevacizumab in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well dynamic susceptibility contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (DSC-MRI) works in measuring relative cerebral blood volume (rCBV) for early response to bevacizumab in patients with glioblastoma that has come back. DSC-MRI may help evaluate changes in the blood vessels within the cancer to determine a patient?s response to treatment.

    at UC Irvine

  • Study of Binimetinib With Encorafenib in Adults With Recurrent BRAF V600-Mutated HGG

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The goal of this study is to estimate the efficacy of encorafenib and binimetinib as measured by radiographic response in recurrent high-grade primary brain tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Testing the Ability of AMG 232 (KRT 232) to Get Into the Tumor in Patients With Brain Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of MDM2 inhibitor KRT-232 in treating patients with glioblastoma (brain cancer) that is newly diagnosed or has come back (recurrent). MDM2 inhibitor KRT-232 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCLA

  • Testing the Use of the Immunotherapy Drugs Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Plus Radiation Therapy in Glioblastoma (Brain Tumor)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial compares the usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide to radiation therapy in combination with immunotherapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed MGMT unmethylated glioblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy photons to kill tumor and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Temozolomide, may not work as well for the treatment of tumors that have the unmethylated MGMT. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies called immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is possible that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work better at time of first diagnosis as opposed to when tumor comes back. Giving radiation therapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab may lengthen the time without brain tumor returning or growing and may extend patients' life compared to usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

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