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HIV/AIDS clinical trials at UC Cancer

9 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Clinical and Genomic Factors for Prognosis of AIDS Primary Effusion Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This research trial studies clinical factors and gene expression analysis for prognosis in tissue samples from patients with acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS)-related primary effusion lymphoma. Gathering health information over time and studying samples of tissue from patients in the laboratory may help doctors learn about the prognosis of patients with AIDS-related primary effusion lymphoma.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    “Study looking at stem cell gene therapy to treat patients with HIV and lymphoma”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Ibrutinib, Rituximab, Etoposide, Prednisone, Vincristine Sulfate, Cyclophosphamide, and Doxorubicin Hydrochloride in Treating Patients With HIV-Positive Stage II-IV Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphomas

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effect and best dose of ibrutinib in combination with rituximab, etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive stage II-IV diffuse large B-cell lymphomas. Ibrutinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Monoclonal antibodies, such as rituximab, may interfere with the ability of cancer cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving ibrutinib and etoposide, prednisone, vincristine sulfate, cyclophosphamide, and doxorubicin hydrochloride may work better in treating patients with HIV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphomas.

    at UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • Nivolumab and Ipilimumab in Treating Patients With HIV Associated Relapsed or Refractory Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma or Solid Tumors That Are Metastatic or Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nivolumab when given with ipilimumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma that has returned after a period of improvement or does not respond to treatment, or solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body or cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Ipilimumab is an antibody that acts against a molecule called cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen 4 (CTLA-4). CTLA-4 controls a part of your immune system by shutting it down. Nivolumab is a type of antibody that is specific for human programmed cell death 1 (PD-1), a protein that is responsible for destruction of immune cells. Giving ipilimumab with nivolumab may work better in treating patients with HIV associated classical Hodgkin lymphoma or solid tumors compared to ipilimumab with nivolumab alone.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • NT-I7 for Kaposi Sarcoma in Patients With or Without HIV

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the best dose and effects of NT-I7 in treating Kaposi sarcoma in patients with or without HIV. NT-I7 works by using a patient's immune system to fight cancer. It is made in a laboratory and is used to boost, direct, or restore the body's natural defenses against cancer. NT-I7 may work better in treating Kaposi sarcoma.

    at UCSF

  • Study of Voicing My CHOiCES as a Tool for Advanced Care Planning in Young Adults With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Background: - There are very few documents to help young adults living with advanced cancer discuss their concerns and end-of-life preferences. A new document, Voicing My CHOiCES, allows young adults to explain what kind of care they would want if they became unable to communicate or make medical decisions on their own. Researchers want to study if this document is helpful. Objective: - To study if Voicing My CHOiCES can reduce anxiety, improve sense of support, and improve communication about advanced care planning. Eligibility: - Adults 18 to 39 years old being treated for cancer. Design: - Participants will answer questions about their age, gender, employment, religion, health, and marital status. They will also complete several brief questionnaires: 1. General Anxiety Short Form 2. Peace, Equanimity and Acceptance in the Cancer Experience 3. Functional Assessment of Social Support 4. Quality of Communication 5. Prior Communication about Advanced Care Planning - Then a health care professional will introduce Voicing My CHOiCES . Participants will review the document and comment on parts they find relevant. They will also say if any important items are missing. Participants will complete 3 pages of the document with the assistance of a health care provider. They will be asked for positive and negative observations. - The second stage of the study will take place about 1 month later. Participants will repeat the brief questionnaires listed above. They will be asked if they shared any of the preferences they described when completing the 3 pages of Voicing My CHOiCES during visit 1 with a family member, friend, or health care provider. Research staff will ask the participant for permission to contact the people they spoke with in order to learn whether their conversations about the document were helpful. They will ask for feedback on how to make Voicing My CHOiCES more helpful.

    at UC Irvine

  • Surgery in Treating Patients With Early Stage Anal Canal or Perianal Cancer and HIV Infection

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies surgery in treating patients with anal canal or perianal cancer that is small and has not spread deeply into the tissues and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Local surgery may be a safer treatment with fewer side effects than bigger surgery or radiation and chemotherapy.

    at UCSF

  • Testing the Addition of an Experimental Medication MK-3475 (Pembrolizumab) to Usual Anti-Retroviral Medications in Patients With HIV and Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of pembrolizumab in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and malignant neoplasms that have come back (relapsed), do not respond to treatment (refractory), or have distributed over a large area in the body (disseminated). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UCSF

  • VGX-3100 and Electroporation in Treating Patients With HIV-Positive High-Grade Anal Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the use of human papillomavirus (HPV) deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) plasmids therapeutic vaccine VGX-3100 (VGX-3100) and electroporation in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive high-grade anal lesions. Vaccines made from DNA may help the body build an effective immune response to kill tumor cells. Electroporation helps pores in your body's cells take in the drug to strengthen your immune system's response. Giving VGX-3100 and electroporation together may work better in treating patients with high-grade anal lesions.

    at UCLA UCSF

Our lead scientists for HIV/AIDS research studies include .

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