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Human Papillomavirus clinical trials at UC Cancer

7 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • De-intensified Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy (Cisplatin) or Immunotherapy (Nivolumab) in Treating Patients With Early-Stage, HPV-Positive, Non-Smoking Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well a reduced dose of radiation therapy works with nivolumab compared to cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body (early-stage), and is not associated with smoking. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see if a reduced dose of radiation therapy and nivolumab works as well as standard dose radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Radiation Therapy With Durvalumab or Cetuximab in Treating Patients With Locoregionally Advanced Head and Neck Cancer Who Cannot Take Cisplatin

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well radiation therapy works with durvalumab or cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer that has spread to a local and/or regional area of the body who cannot take cisplatin. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Cetuximab is a monoclonal antibody that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not known if radiation therapy with durvalumab will work better than the usual therapy of radiation therapy with cetuximab in treating patients with head and neck cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Sodium Thiosulfate for the Prevention of Ototoxicity in Patients With Locally Advanced Squamous Cell Cancer of the Head and Neck Undergoing Chemoradiation With Cisplatin

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial investigates how well sodium thiosulfate works in preventing ototoxicity (hearing loss/damage) in patients with squamous cell cancer of the head and neck that has spread to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) who are undergoing a chemoradiation. Sodium thiosulfate is a type of medication used to treat cyanide poisoning and to help lessen the side effects from cisplatin. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving chemotherapy with radiation therapy may kill more tumor cells. The purpose of this trial is to find out whether it is feasible to give sodium thiosulfate 4 hours after each cisplatin infusion along with standard of care radiation therapy in patients with head and neck cancer. Giving sodium thiosulfate after cisplatin may help decrease the risk of hearing loss.

    at UCSF

  • Stereotactic Body Radiation Therapy and Durvalumab With or Without Tremelimumab Before Surgery in Treating Participants With Human Papillomavirus Positive Oropharyngeal Squamous Cell Caner

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase Ib/II trial studies the side effects and how well stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery work in treating participants with human papillomavirus positive oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. Stereotactic body radiation therapy is a specialized radiation therapy that sends x-rays directly to the tumor using smaller doses over several days and may cause less damage to normal tissue. Monoclonal antibodies, such as durvalumab and tremelimumab, may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving stereotactic body radiation therapy and durvalumab with or without tremelimumab before surgery may work better in treating participants with oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer.

    at UCLA

  • Study of PDS0101 and Pembrolizumab Combination I/O in Subjects With HPV16 + Recurrent and/or Metastatic HNSCC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    VERSATILE-002 is a Phase 2, open-label, multicenter study of the efficacy and safety of PDS0101 administered in combination with pembrolizumab in the first line treatment of adults with HPV16 and PD-L1 positive recurrent or metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    at UCSF

  • Topical or Ablative Treatment in Preventing Anal Cancer in Patients With HIV and Anal High-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions

    open to eligible people ages 35 years and up

    This randomized phase III trial compares topical or ablative treatment with active monitoring in preventing anal cancer in patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Anal HSIL is tissue in the anal canal that has been damaged by infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) and is at risk for turning into anal cancer. It is not yet known if treating HSIL is more effective than active monitoring in preventing patients from developing anal cancer.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Window of Opportunity Study of IPI-549 in Patients With Locally Advanced HPV+ and HPV- Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to investigate how effective the study drug IPI-549 is against types of cancers. IPI-549 is considered experimental because it is not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for the treatment of cancer. Patients will be treated with 3 weeks of IPI-549, a specific PI3Kγ inhibitor. Tumor tissue for research purposes through core biopsies will be obtained prior to initiation of IPI-549 and at surgery.

    at UCSD

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