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Immunodeficiency clinical trials at UC Cancer

2 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • Gene Therapy in Treating Patients With Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Related Lymphoma Receiving Stem Cell Transplant

    “Study looking at stem cell gene therapy to treat patients with HIV and lymphoma”

    open to eligible people ages 19 years and up

    This phase I/II trial studies the side effects and best dose of gene therapy in treating patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-related lymphoma that did not respond to therapy or came back after an original response receiving stem cell transplant. In gene therapy, small stretches of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) called "anti-HIV genes" are introduced into the stem cells in the laboratory to make the gene therapy product used in this study. The type of anti-HIV genes and therapy in this study may make the patient's immune cells more resistant to HIV-1 and prevent new immune cells from getting infected with HIV-1.

    at UC Davis UCSD UCSF

  • Study of Thiotepa and TEPA Drug Exposure in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplant Patients

    open to eligible people ages up to 17 years

    Thiotepa is a chemotherapy drug used extensively in bone marrow transplantation. Thiotepa is a prodrug that undergoes metabolic conversion in the liver by CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 to its primary active metabolite, TEPA. The goal of this study is to determine what causes some children to have different drug concentrations of thiotepa and TEPA in their bodies and if drug levels are related to whether or not a child experiences severe side-effects during their bone marrow transplant. The hypothesis is that certain clinical and genetic factors cause changes in thiotepa and TEPA drug levels in pediatric bone marrow transplant patients and that high levels may cause severe side-effects.

    at UCSF

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