Skip to main content

Immunotherapy clinical trials at UC Cancer

28 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • [18F]FAraG PET Imaging for Analysis of Biodistribution in Cancer Patients Expected to Undergo Immunotherapy and/or Radiation Therapy

    open to eligible people ages 18-65

    This is a Phase 1 study is to visualize biodistribution of a PET tracer called [18F]F-AraG (VisAcT) in cancer patients expected to undergo immunotherapy and/or radiation therapy.

    at UCSF

  • A Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Advanced Liver Cancers (Morpheus-Liver)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase Ib/II, open-label, multicenter, randomized umbrella study in participants with advanced liver cancers. The study is designed with the flexibility to open new treatment arms as new treatments become available, close existing treatment arms that demonstrate minimal clinical activity or unacceptable toxicity, modify the participant population, or introduce additional cohorts of participants with other types of advanced primary liver cancer. Cohort 1 will enroll participants with locally advanced or metastatic hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) who have not received prior systemic therapy for their disease. Eligible participants will initially be randomly assigned to one of several treatment arms (Stage 1). Participants who experience loss of clinical benefit or unacceptable toxicity during Stage 1 may be eligible to receive treatment with a different treatment combination (Stage 2). When a Stage 2 treatment combination is available, this will be introduced by amending the protocol.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSD UCSF

  • A Study of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Participants With Metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (Morpheus-Pancreatic Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase Ib/II, open-label, multicenter, randomized study designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary anti-tumor activity of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in participants with metastatic Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma (PDAC). Two cohorts will be enrolled in parallel in this study: Cohort 1 will consist of patients who have received no prior systemic therapy for metastatic PDAC, and Cohort 2 will consist of patients who have received one line of prior systemic therapy for PDAC. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms.

    at UCSF

  • A Study of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatment Combinations in Patients With Locally Advanced Unresectable or Metastatic Gastric or Gastroesophageal Junction Cancer (G/GEJ) or Esophageal Cancer (Morpheus-Gastric and Esophageal Cancer)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase Ib/II, open label, multi-center, randomized study designed to assess the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics and preliminary anti-tumor activity of immunotherapy-based treatment combinations in patients with locally advanced unresectable or metastatic G/GEJ cancer (hereafter referred to as gastric cancer) and esophageal cancer. Two cohorts of patients with gastric cancer have been enrolled in parallel in this study: the second-line (2L) Gastric Cancer Cohort consists of patients with gastric cancer who have progressed after receiving a platinum-containing or fluoropyrimide-containing chemotherapy regimen in the first-line setting, and the first-line (1L) Gastric Cancer Cohort consists of patients with gastric cancer who have not received prior chemotherapy in this setting. In each cohort, eligible patients will be assigned to one of several treatment arms. Additionally, a cohort of patients with esophageal cancer who have not received prior systemic treatment for their disease will be enrolled in this study. Eligible patients will be randomized to chemotherapy or the combination of chemotherapy with checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy.

    at UCLA

  • A Study Testing the Effect of Immunotherapy (Ipilimumab and Nivolumab) in Patients With Recurrent Glioblastoma With Elevated Mutational Burden

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the effect of immunotherapy drugs (ipilimumab and nivolumab) in treating patients with glioblastoma that has come back (recurrent) and carries a high number of mutations. Cancer is caused by changes (mutations) to genes that control the way cells function. Tumors with high number of mutations may respond well to immunotherapy. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies such as ipilimumab and nivolumab may help the body's immune system attack the cancer and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving ipilimumab and nivolumab may lower the chance of recurrent glioblastoma with high number of mutations from growing or spreading compared to usual care (surgery or chemotherapy).

    at UCSD

  • Biologic Therapy to Prevent Osteoarthritis After ACL Injury

    open to eligible people ages 18-35

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are extremely common. On average, 50% of individuals suffering an ACL injury will develop radiographic osteoarthritis (OA) 10 to 20 years after injury. Unfortunately, ACL reconstruction does not prevent risk of future OA. Interleukin-1 (IL-1) levels in the human knee joint increase transiently after an ACL injury. In animal experiments, if interleukin-1 levels are increased in the joint, this alone causes arthritis to occur. Interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1Ra) is a naturally occurring inhibitor of IL-1. However, in ACL injuries the balance of these two proteins is disturbed transiently after injury, with the effects of IL-1 dominating this balance. In a large animal model of ACL injury, injection of IL-1Ra into the knee joint after ACL injury significantly decreased the amount of arthritis that was later observed.Thus, the investigators hypothesize that injection of IL-1 inhibitor (IL-1Ra) into the knee joint of patients suffering recent ACL injury will decrease the incidence of cartilage damage. After appropriate IRB approval, a total of 48 active patients will be randomized into one of three treatment groups. Group 1 will receive removal of the knee joint fluid (aspiration of hemarthrosis) using a needle and syringe within 1 week of injury. Following aspiration of the knee joint, an injection of 5 milliliters (mls) of sterile saline (as a placebo control) will be administered. In addition, a second knee aspiration procedure and an injection of 5mls of sterile saline into the injured knee joint will be performed at 10 days post-injury. Group 2 will receive aspiration of the knee hemarthrosis as described in group 1 as well as intra-articular administration of 150mg (~5mls) of anakinra (rhIL-1Ra) within 7 days of ACL injury. In addition, a second knee aspiration and injection of 5mls of sterile saline into the injured knee joint will be performed at 10 days post-injury. Group 3 patients will receive aspiration of the knee hemarthrosis and injection of anakinra as described in group 2 as well as a second intra-articular knee injection of anakinra (150mg, ~5mls) on post-injury day 10. Thus, all patients in this randomized placebo-controlled trial will undergo two injection procedures prior to surgery. Investigators will analyze subjects self-reported function and pain scores as well as urinary levels of cartilage breakdown products over time. Additionally, MRI studies will be used to compare MRI findings among patients in these 3 treatment groups. Urine samples will be obtain prior to surgery, at the time of surgery and at multiple time points after surgery (3, 6, 9, 12 and 24 months after surgery). Subjective outcome measure assessments (surveys) will be completed by participants prior to surgery and then again at 6, 9, 12 and 24 months post-operatively. MRI studies will be obtained at 1 year and 2 years following surgery. Additional, MRI studies at earlier time points are optional.

    at UCLA

  • Checkpoint Blockade Immunotherapy Combined With Stereotactic Body Radiation in Advanced Metastatic Disease

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to determine whether stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) combined with checkpoint blockaded immunotherapy (CBI) will improve the response to the anticancer treatment compared to CBI alone in patients with advanced metastatic cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Chemoradiation vs Immunotherapy and Radiation for Head and Neck Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of this study is to compare any good or bad effects of using pembrolizumab (an experimental drug) and radiation therapy (RT), compared to using cisplatin chemotherapy and radiation therapy (RT) in the treatment of patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC).

    at UCSD

  • De-intensified Radiation Therapy With Chemotherapy (Cisplatin) or Immunotherapy (Nivolumab) in Treating Patients With Early-Stage, HPV-Positive, Non-Smoking Associated Oropharyngeal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial studies how well a reduced dose of radiation therapy works with nivolumab compared to cisplatin in treating patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal cancer that is early in its growth and may not have spread to other parts of the body (early-stage), and is not associated with smoking. Radiation therapy uses high-energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as cisplatin, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. This trial is being done to see if a reduced dose of radiation therapy and nivolumab works as well as standard dose radiation therapy and cisplatin in treating patients with oropharyngeal cancer.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Experimental Immunotherapy (Nivolumab or Brentuximab Vedotin) With Chemotherapy for Advanced Stage Classical Hodgkin Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 12 years and up

    This phase III trial compares immunotherapy drugs (nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin) when given with combination chemotherapy in treating patients with newly diagnosed stage III or IV classic Hodgkin lymphoma. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Brentuximab vedotin is a monoclonal antibody, brentuximab, linked to a toxic agent called vedotin. Brentuximab attaches to cancer cells in a targeted way and delivers vedotin to kill them. Chemotherapy drugs, such as doxorubicin, vinblastine, and dacarbazine, work in different ways to stop the growth of cancer cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The addition of nivolumab or brentuximab vedotin to combination chemotherapy may shrink the cancer or extend the time without disease symptoms coming back.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSD

  • Immunotherapy (Nivolumab and Ipilimumab) Before and After Surgery for the Treatment of Recurrent or Progressive High Grade Glioma in Children and Young Adults

    open to eligible people ages 6 months to 22 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects of nivolumab and ipilimumab before and after surgery in treating children and young adults with high grade glioma that has come back (recurrent) or is increasing in scope or severity (progressive). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UCSF

  • Immunotherapy in Patients With Metastatic Cancers and CDK12 Mutations

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study will attempt to determine the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitor immunotherapy with nivolumab and ipilimumab combination therapy followed by nivolumab monotherapy in patients with metastatic prostate cancer harboring loss of CDK12 function.

    at UCSD UCSF

  • Immunotherapy of Relapsed Refractory Neuroblastoma With Expanded NK Cells

    open to eligible people ages 1 month to 30 years

    This NANT trial will determine the maximum tolerated dose (MTD) of autologous expanded natural killer (NK) cells when combined with standard dosing of ch14.18 and will assess the feasibility of adding lenalidomide at the recommended Phase II dose of the expanded NK cells with ch14.18, for treatment of children with refractory or recurrent neuroblastoma.

    at UCSF

  • Lenvatinib (E7080/MK-7902) in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) vs. Standard Chemotherapy and Lenvatinib Monotherapy in Participants With Recurrent/Metastatic Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma That Progressed After Platinum Therapy and Immunotherapy (MK-7902-009/E7080-G000-228/LEAP-009)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This study is designed to assess the safety and efficacy of lenvatinib in combination with pembrolizumab versus standard of care (SOC) chemotherapy, and to also assess the safety and efficacy of lenvatinib monotherapy in participants with recurrent/metastatic head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (R/M HNSCC) that have progressed after platinum therapy and a programmed cell death protein 1 (PD-1) or anti-programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) inhibitor. The primary hypothesis is that lenvatinib + pembrolizumab is superior to SOC chemotherapy with respect to ORR per modified Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors (RECIST) 1.1 as assessed by blinded independent central review.

    at UCLA

  • Long-term Follow-Up Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics' Engineered Cellular Immunotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purpose of the study is to assess long-term side effects from subjects who receive a Fate Therapeutics genetically modified NK cell product. Subjects who previously took part in a Fate Therapeutics study and received genetically changed NK cells will take part in this long-term follow-up study. Subjects will join this study once they complete the parent interventional study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study. For a period of 15 years starting from the last administration of Fate Therapeutics genetically modified NK cell product, subjects will be assessed for long-term safety and survival through questionnaires and blood tests.

    at UCSD

  • Long-term, Non-interventional, Observational Study Following Treatment With Fate Therapeutics FT500 Cellular Immunotherapy

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Subjects who previously took part in the FT500-101 study and received allogeneic NK cell immunotherapy will take part in this long term follow-up study. Subjects will automatically enroll into study FT-003 once they have withdrawn or complete the parent interventional study. The purpose of this study is to provide long-term safety and survival data for subjects who have participated in the parent study. No additional study drug will be given, but subjects can receive other therapies for their cancer while they are being followed for long term safety in this study.

    at UCSD

  • National Translational Science Network of Precision-based Immunotherapy for Primary Liver Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Background: Primary Liver Cancer is the second most common cause of cancer-related death worldwide. It is the cancer with the fastest rising incidence and mortality in the United States. Researchers want to learn more about liver cancer to help them design better treatments. Objective: To better understand liver cancer. Eligibility: People ages 18 and older who have liver cancer and had or are planning to have immune therapy Design: Participants will be screened with a review of their medical records. They will be asked about their medical history and test results. Participants will come to the NIH Clinical Center. During this visit, their medical records, test results, imaging studies, and tissue samples (if available) will be gathered. Participants will learn the results of a test to see if they have any mutations known to be connected to cancer. They will learn if there are treatment options for them. Participants will give blood, urine, and stool samples or rectal swabs. Participants will not have follow-up visits just for this study. If they join another NIH research study and have visits for this other study, their medical records; test results; and blood, urine, and stool samples may be collected. This will occur about every 3 months. If they have a biopsy or surgery on another study or as part of treatment and there is leftover tissue, researchers would like to collect some of that tissue. Participants will be contacted every 6 months by phone or e-mail. They will be asked about their health. They will provide any medical records, test results, and imaging studies. Participants will be followed on this study for life.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Preoperative Immunotherapy in Patients With Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Head and Neck

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    To determine the effect of neoadjuvant atezolizumab alone or in combination with other immune modulating agents on T-cell infiltration in advanced SCCHN. To determine the impact of neo-adjuvant immunotherapy on surgical outcomes.

    at UCSF

  • Stereotactic Radiosurgery and Immunotherapy (Pembrolizumab) for the Treatment of Recurrent Meningioma

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies the effect of stereotactic radiosurgery and pembrolizumab in treating patients with meningioma that has come back (recurrent). Stereotactic radiosurgery is a type of external radiation therapy that uses special equipment to position the patient and precisely give a single large dose of radiation to a tumor. It is used to treat brain tumors and other brain disorders that cannot be treated by regular surgery. Pembrolizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody. An antibody is a common type of protein made in the body in response to a foreign substance. Antibodies attack foreign substances and protect against infection. Antibodies can also be produced in the laboratory for use in treating patients; an antibody that is made in the lab is also known as a humanized monoclonal antibody. Pembrolizumab is a highly selective humanized monoclonal antibody that is designed to block the action of the receptor PD-1. It has been studied in lab experiments and in other types of cancer. The PD-1 receptor works to keep the immune system from noticing tumor cells. The addition of pembrolizumab to stereotactic radiosurgery may improve the progression free survival of patients with meningioma.

    at UCSF

  • Study Evaluating the Efficacy and Safety of Multiple Immunotherapy-Based Treatments and Combinations in Patients With Urothelial Carcinoma (MORPHEUS-UC)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    A Phase Ib/II, open-label, multicenter, randomized, umbrella study in participants with cisplatin-ineligible MIBC and in participants with locally advanced or metastatic Urothelial Carcinoma (UC) who have progressed during or following a platinum-containing regimen. The study is designed with the flexibility to open new treatment arms as new treatments become available, close existing treatment arms that demonstrate minimal clinical activity or unacceptable toxicity, or modify the participant population (e.g., with regard to prior anti-cancer treatment or biomarker status). Participants in the mUC Cohort who experience loss of clinical benefit or unacceptable toxicity during Stage 1 may be eligible to continue treatment with a different treatment regimen for Stage 2.

    at UCLA UCSF

  • Study looking at targeted chemotherapy and immunotherapy in treating patients with advanced/metastatic genitourinary tumors

    “Targeted chemotherapy and immunotherapy medicine with or without additional immunotherapy medicine to treat bladder/urothelial cancer”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best doses of cabozantinib s-malate and nivolumab with or without ipilimumab in treating patients with genitourinary (genital and urinary organ) tumors that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic). Cabozantinib s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is not yet known whether giving cabozantinib s-malate and nivolumab alone or with ipilimumab works better in treating patients with genitourinary tumors.

    at UC Davis

  • Testing the Addition of a Type of Drug Called Immunotherapy to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment for Non-small Cell Lung Cancer, ALCHEMIST Chemo-IO Study

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase III ALCHEMIST trial compares the addition of pembrolizumab to usual chemotherapy versus usual chemotherapy for the treatment of stage IB, II, or IIIA non-small cell lung cancer that has been removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as cisplatin, pemetrexed, carboplatin, gemcitabine hydrochloride, and paclitaxel, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. The purpose of this trial is to find out if the addition of pembrolizumab to usual chemotherapy is better or worse than usual chemotherapy alone for non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UC Davis UCSD

  • Testing the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug Pembrolizumab to the Usual Chemotherapy Treatment (Paclitaxel and Carboplatin) in Stage III-IV or Recurrent Endometrial Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial studies how well the combination of pembrolizumab, paclitaxel and carboplatin works compared with paclitaxel and carboplatin alone in treating patients with endometrial cancer that is stage III or IV, or has come back (recurrent). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Paclitaxel and carboplatin are chemotherapy drugs used as part of the usual treatment approach for this type of cancer. This study aims to assess if adding immunotherapy to these drugs is better or worse than the usual approach for treatment of this cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCLA UCSD

  • Testing the Addition of the Immunotherapy Drug, Pembrolizumab, to the Usual Radiation Treatment for Newly Diagnosed Early Stage High Intermediate Risk Endometrial Cancer

    open to eligible females ages 18 years and up

    This phase III trial compares whether the addition of pembrolizumab to radiation therapy is more effective than radiation therapy alone in reducing the risk of cancer coming back (recurrence) in patients with newly diagnosed stage I-II endometrial cancer. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. The addition of pembrolizumab to radiation treatment may be more effective than radiation treatment alone in reducing cancer recurrence.

    at UCLA UCSD

  • Testing the Effectiveness of Two Immunotherapy Drugs (Nivolumab and Ipilimumab) With One Anti-cancer Targeted Drug (Cabozantinib) for Rare Genitourinary Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib works in combination with nivolumab and ipilimumab in treating patients with rare genitourinary (GU) tumors that have spread to other places in the body. Cabozantinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, and ipilimumab may work better in treating patients with genitourinary tumors that have no treatment options compared to giving cabozantinib, nivolumab, or ipilimumab alone.

    at UCLA

  • Testing the Use of the Immunotherapy Drugs Ipilimumab and Nivolumab Plus Radiation Therapy in Glioblastoma (Brain Tumor)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II/III trial compares the usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide to radiation therapy in combination with immunotherapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab in treating patients with newly diagnosed MGMT unmethylated glioblastoma. Radiation therapy uses high energy photons to kill tumor and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Temozolomide, may not work as well for the treatment of tumors that have the unmethylated MGMT. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies called immune checkpoint inhibitors, such as ipilimumab and nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. It is possible that immune checkpoint inhibitors may work better at time of first diagnosis as opposed to when tumor comes back. Giving radiation therapy with ipilimumab and nivolumab may lengthen the time without brain tumor returning or growing and may extend patients' life compared to usual treatment with radiation therapy and temozolomide.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

  • TTX-030 in Combination With Immunotherapy and/or Chemotherapy in Subjects With Advanced Cancers

    open to eligible people ages 18-110

    This is a phase 1/1b study of TTX-030 in combination therapy, an antibody that inhibits CD39 enzymatic activity, leading to accumulation of pro-inflammatory adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and reduction of immunosuppressive adenosine, which may change the tumor microenvironment and promote anti-tumor immune response. This trial will study the safety, tolerability, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and anti-tumor activity of TTX-030 in combination with immunotherapy and/or standard chemotherapies.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA

  • Vaccine-Based Immunotherapy Regimen For NSCLC and TNBC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Part 1of the study will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and immunogenicity of increasing doses of a vaccine-based immunotherapy regimen (VBIR-2) for patients with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer and metastatic triple-negative breast cancer. Part 2 will evaluate the safety, pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, immunogenicity and preliminary evidence of efficacy of the Expansion dose of VBIR-2 in participants with advanced or metastatic non-small cell lung cancer.

    at UCLA UCSD

Last updated: