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Neuroblastoma clinical trials at UC Cancer

23 research studies open to eligible people

Showing trials for
  • A Study of Therapeutic Iobenguane (131-I) and Vorinostat for Recurrent or Progressive High-Risk Neuroblastoma Subjects

    open to eligible people ages 1 year and up

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of 131I-MIBG in combination with Vorinostat in patients with Recurrent or Progressive neuroblastoma

    at UCSF

  • Eflornithine (DFMO) and Etoposide for Relapsed/Refractory Neuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 31 years

    Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) will be used in an open label, multicenter, study in combination with etoposide for subjects with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma.

    at UCSF

  • Irinotecan Hydrochloride, Temozolomide, and Dinutuximab With or Without Eflornithine in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages 1 year and up

    This phase II trial studies how well irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab work with or without eflornithine in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or that isn't responding to treatment (refractory). Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as irinotecan hydrochloride and temozolomide, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as dinutuximab, may induce changes in the body's immune system and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Eflornithine blocks the production of chemicals called polyamines that are important in the growth of cancer cells. Giving eflornithine with irinotecan hydrochloride, temozolomide, and dinutuximab, may work better in treating patients with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • Ivosidenib in Treating Patients With Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With IDH1 Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well ivosidenib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders that have IDH1 genetic alterations (mutations). Ivosidenib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in an important signaling pathway called the IDH pathway.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Larotrectinib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With NTRK Fusions (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well larotrectinib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with NTRK fusions that may have spread from where it first started to nearby tissue, lymph nodes, or distant parts of the body (advanced) and have come back (relpased) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Larotrectinib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UCSF

  • MIBG With Dinutuximab +/- Vorinostat

    open to eligible people ages 1-30

    131I-Metaiodobenzylguanidine (131I-MIBG) is one of the most effective therapies utilized for neuroblastoma patients with refractory or relapsed disease. In this pediatric phase 1 trial, 131I-MIBG will be given in combination with dinutuximab, a chimeric 14.18 monoclonal antibody. This study will utilize a traditional Phase I rolling 6 dose escalation design to determine a recommended phase 2 pediatric dose. An expansion cohort of an additional 6 patients will then be enrolled. If tolerable, vorinostat will then be added to the third dose level. A 6 patient expansion cohort may then be enrolled.

    at UCSF

  • NANT 2015-02: A Phase 1 Study of Lorlatinib (PF-06463922)

    open to eligible people ages 1-99

    Lorlatinib is a novel inhibitor across ALK variants, including those resistant to crizotinib. In this first pediatric phase 1 trial of lorlatinib, the drug will be utilized as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy in patients with relapsed/refractory neuroblastoma. The dose escalation phase of this study (Cohort A1) uses a traditional Phase I 3+3 design. Once a recommended phase 2 pediatric dose is identified, an expansion cohort of 6 patients (Cohort B1), within which ALKi naïve patients will be prioritized, will be initiated. Parallel cohorts will be initiated in adults or patients with large BSA (Cohort A2) and in combination with chemotherapy upon establishing RP2D (Cohort B2).

    at UCSF

  • Neuroblastoma Maintenance Therapy Trial

    open to eligible people ages 1-30

    Difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) will be used in an open label, single agent, multicenter, study for patients with neuroblastoma in remission. In this study subjects will receive 730 Days of oral difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) at a dose of 750 mg/m2 ± 250 mg/m2 BID (strata 1, 2, 3, and 4) OR 2500 mg/m2 BID (stratum 1B) on each day of study. This study will focus on the use of DFMO in high risk neuroblastoma patients that are in remission as a strategy to prevent recurrence.

    at UCSF

  • Open-Label Study of 18F-mFBG for Imaging Neuroblastoma

    open to all eligible people

    This is a Phase 3 study evaluating the positron-emitting radiopharmaceutical 18F-mFBG as an imaging agent for confirming or excluding the presence of neuroblastoma

    at UCSF

  • Pediatric Precision Laboratory Advanced Neuroblastoma Therapy

    open to eligible people ages up to 22 years

    A prospective open label, multicenter study to evaluate the feasibility and acute toxicity of using molecularly guided therapy in combination with standard therapy followed by a Randomized Controlled Trial of standard immunotherapy with or without DFMO followed by DFMO maintenance for Subjects with Newly Diagnosed High-Risk Neuroblastoma.

    at UCSF

  • Response and Biology-Based Risk Factor-Guided Therapy in Treating Younger Patients With Non-high Risk Neuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 18 months

    This phase III trial studies how well response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy works in treating younger patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma. Sometimes a tumor may not need treatment until it progresses. In this case, observation may be sufficient. Measuring biomarkers in tumor cells may help plan when effective treatment is necessary and what the best treatment is. Response and biology-based risk factor-guided therapy may be effective in treating patients with non-high risk neuroblastoma and may help to avoid some of the risks and side effects related to standard treatment.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Samotolisib in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With TSC or PI3K/MTOR Mutations (A Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II Pediatric MATCH trial studies how well samotolisib works in treating patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders with TSC or PI3K/MTOR mutations that have spread to other places in the body (metastatic) and have come back (recurrent) or do not respond to treatment (refractory). Samotolisib may stop the growth of cancer cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Selpercatinib for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders With Activating RET Gene Alterations, a Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well selpercatinib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have activating RET gene alterations. Selpercatinib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in an important signaling pathway (called the RET pathway) and may reduce tumor size.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Study Of Palbociclib Combined With Chemotherapy In Pediatric Patients With Recurrent/Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 2-20

    A study to learn about safety and find out maximum tolerable dose of palbociclib given in combination with chemotherapy (temozolomide with irinotecan or topotecan with cyclophosphamide) in children, adolescents and young adults with recurrent or refractory solid tumors (phase 1). Phase 2 to learn about the efficacy of palbociclib in combination with irinotecan and temozolomide when compared with irinotecan and temozolomide alone in the treatment of children, adolescents, and young adults with recurrent or refractory Ewing sarcoma (EWS).

    at UCSF

  • Targeted Therapy Directed by Genetic Testing in Treating Pediatric Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Advanced Solid Tumors, Non-Hodgkin Lymphomas, or Histiocytic Disorders (The Pediatric MATCH Screening Trial)

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This Pediatric MATCH screening and multi-sub-study phase II trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in pediatric patients with solid tumors, non-Hodgkin lymphomas, or histiocytic disorders that have progressed following at least one line of standard systemic therapy and/or for which no standard treatment exists that has been shown to prolong survival. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic changes or abnormalities (mutations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic mutation, and may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors or non-Hodgkin lymphomas.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Tegavivint for the Treatment of Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors, Including Lymphomas and Desmoid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 30 years

    This phase I/II trial evaluates the highest safe dose, side effects, and possible benefits of tegavivint in treating patients with solid tumors that has come back (recurrent) or does not respond to treatment (refractory). Tegavivint interferes with the binding of beta-catenin to TBL1, which may help stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking the signals passed from one molecule to another inside a cell that tell a cell to grow.

    at UCSF

  • Testing the Addition of 131I-MIBG or Lorlatinib to Intensive Therapy in People With High-Risk Neuroblastoma (NBL)

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This phase III trial studies iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy in treating younger patients with newly-diagnosed high-risk neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Radioactive drugs, such as iobenguane I-131, may carry radiation directly to tumor cells and not harm normal cells. Lorlatinib may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Giving iobenguane I-131 or lorlatinib and standard therapy may work better compared to lorlatinib and standard therapy alone in treating younger patients with neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Testing the Combination of Two Immunotherapy Drugs (Magrolimab and Dinutuximab) in Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Neuroblastoma or Relapsed Osteosarcoma

    open to eligible people ages 1-35

    This phase I trial is to find out the best dose, possible benefits and/or side effects of magrolimab in combination with dinutuximab in treating patients with neuroblastoma that has come back (relapsed) or does not respond to treatment (refractory) or relapsed osteosarcoma. Magrolimab and dinutuximab are monoclonal antibodies that may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. The combination of magrolimab and dinutuximab may shrink or stabilize relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma or relapsed osteosarcoma. In addition, this trial may help researchers find out if it is safe to give magrolimab and dinutuximab after surgery to remove tumors from the lungs.

    at UCSF

  • Tipifarnib for the Treatment of Advanced Solid Tumors, Lymphoma, or Histiocytic Disorders With HRAS Gene Alterations, a Pediatric MATCH Treatment Trial

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase II pediatric MATCH trial studies how well tipifarnib works in treating patients with solid tumors that have recurred or spread to other places in the body (advanced), lymphoma, or histiocytic disorders, that have a genetic alteration in the gene HRAS. Tipifarnib may block the growth of cancer cells that have specific genetic changes in a gene called HRAS and may reduce tumor size.

    at UC Davis UCLA UCSF

  • Trial of CUDC-907 in Children and Young Adults With Relapsed or Refractory Solid Tumors, CNS Tumors, or Lymphoma

    open to eligible people ages 1-21

    This research study is evaluating a novel drug called CUDC-907 as a possible treatment for resistant (refractory) pediatric solid tumors (including neuroblastoma), lymphoma, or brain tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Biomarkers in Tumor Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Neuroblastoma or Ganglioneuroblastoma

    open to eligible people ages up to 30 years

    This research trial studies biomarkers in tumor tissue samples from patients with newly diagnosed neuroblastoma or ganglioneuroblastoma. Studying samples of tumor tissue from patients with cancer in the laboratory may help doctors identify and learn more about biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCLA UCSF

  • Collecting and Storing Tissue From Young Patients With Cancer

    open to eligible people ages up to 21 years

    This laboratory study is collecting and storing tissue, blood, and bone marrow samples from young patients with cancer. Collecting and storing samples of tissue, blood, and bone marrow from patients with cancer to study in the laboratory may help doctors learn more about changes that may occur in DNA and identify biomarkers related to cancer.

    at UCSF

  • Neuroblastoma Biology Study

    open to eligible people ages up to 99 years

    Medical scientists want to find better ways to treat neuroblastoma and to find ways to prevent the tumor from growing back. To do this, they need more information about the characteristics of neuroblastoma cells. Therefore, they want to study samples of neuroblastoma tissues and neuroblastoma and normal cells in the blood and bone marrow that may be related to the growth of neuroblastoma cells. Doctors and other medical scientists also want to find better ways to detect and measure neuroblastoma to improve the ability to follow the response of tumor cells to therapy.

    at UCSF

Our lead scientists for Neuroblastoma research studies include .

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