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Rectal Cancer clinical trials at UC Cancer

9 research studies open to eligible people

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  • COM701 (an Inhibitor of PVRIG) in Subjects With Advanced Solid Tumors.

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This is a Phase 1 open label sequential dose escalation and cohort expansion study evaluating the safety, tolerability and preliminary clinical activity of COM701 as monotherapy and in combination with nivolumab.

    at UCLA

  • Evaluation of SINGLE PORT (SP) Robotic Technology in Colorectal Surgery

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Currently a multiport robotic surgery platform (Intuitive Xi) is widely available and used for colorectal surgery indications. A Single port platform (Intuitive SP) is FDA approved for Head and Neck and Urology but has not been widely used in colorectal surgery. This study seeks to evaluate the safe and effective use of the SP platform for colorectal surgery indications.

    at UCSF

  • Improving Nutrition and Physical Activity for Colorectal Cancer Survivors (Tools To Be Fit)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This clinical trial studies the effect of four different intervention components "tools" on body weight, nutrition, and physical activity in colorectal cancer survivors. Studies indicate that people with colorectal cancer whose nutrition and physical activity habits are consistent with the American Cancer Society's Nutrition and Physical Activity Guidelines may have longer disease-free survival. The four different intervention components may help patients with colon or rectal cancer adopt recommended health behaviors after they have completed treatment.

    at UCSF

  • Multicenter Phase II Study of Transanal TME (taTME)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    Radical rectal cancer resection, namely total mesorectal excision (TME), is the cornerstone of the treatment of resectable rectal cancer. In combination with chemotherapy and radiation treatment (CRT), complete TME with negative resection margins is associated with sustained local and systemic control even in locally advanced disease. Over the last 2 decades, laparoscopic and robotic techniques have been increasingly adopted due to reduced surgical trauma and faster patient recovery. Yet, both approaches are associated with equivalent postoperative morbidity and disturbances in sexual, urinary and defecatory function relative to open TME. Furthermore, laparoscopic and robotic TME remain associated with substantial conversion rates and variable rates of TME completeness as a result of the procedural difficulties reaching the low rectum from the abdominal approach. Transanal TME (taTME) with laparoscopic assistance was developed to facilitate completion of TME using a primary transanal endoscopic approach. Transanal TME uses a "bottom-up approach" to overcome the technical difficulties of low pelvic dissection using an abdominal approach. Published results from single-center taTME series and an international registry suggest the short-term procedural and oncologic safety of this approach in resectable rectal cancer. No multicenter phase II study has yet been conducted to validate the procedural safety, functional outcomes or long-term oncologic outcomes of this approach. Study Design: This is a 5-year phase II multicenter single-arm study to evaluate the safety and efficacy of low anterior resection (LAR) with taTME using laparoscopic or robotic assistance in 100 eligible subjects with resectable rectal cancer. Hypothesis: taTME is non-inferior to standard LAR with respect to the quality of the TME achieved.

    at UC Irvine

  • S0820, Adenoma and Second Primary Prevention Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The investigators hypothesize that the combination of eflornithine and sulindac will be effective in reducing a three-year event rate of adenomas and second primary colorectal cancers in patients previously treated for Stages 0 through III colon or rectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine UCSD

  • Short Course Radiation Therapy and Combination Chemotherapy for the Treatment of Stage II-III Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase I trial investigates how well short-course radiation therapy followed by combination chemotherapy works in treating patients with stage II-III rectal cancer. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Chemotherapy drugs, such as leucovorin, fluorouracil, oxaliplatin, and capecitabine, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving short-course radiation therapy and combination chemotherapy may reduce the need for surgery and therefore improve quality of life.

    at UCLA

  • Testing Nivolumab and Ipilimumab With Short-Course Radiation in Locally Advanced Rectal Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial investigates the effect of nivolumab and ipilimumab when given together with short-course radiation therapy in treating patients with rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (advanced). Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab and ipilimumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Radiation therapy uses high energy x-rays to kill tumor cells and shrink tumors. Giving nivolumab, ipilimumab, and radiation therapy may kill more cancer cells.

    at UC Irvine

  • Testing the Addition of Nivolumab to Standard Treatment for Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colorectal Cancer That Have a BRAF Mutation

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial tests whether adding nivolumab to the usual treatment (encorafenib and cetuximab) works better than the usual treatment alone to shrink tumors in patients with colorectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or that cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) and whose tumor has a mutation in a gene called BRAF. Encorafenib is in a class of medications called kinase inhibitors. It is used in patients whose cancer has a certain mutation (change) in the BRAF gene. It works by blocking the action of mutated BRAF that signals cancer cells to multiply. This helps to stop or slow the spread of cancer cells. Cetuximab is in a class of medications called monoclonal antibodies. It binds to a protein called EGFR, which is found on some types of cancer cells. This may help keep cancer cells from growing. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as nivolumab, may help the body's immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread. Giving nivolumab in combination with encorafenib and cetuximab may be more effective than encorafenib and cetuximab alone at stopping tumor growth and spreading in patients with metastatic or unresectable BRAF-mutant colorectal cancer.

    at UC Irvine

  • Genetic Testing in Screening Patients With Metastatic or Unresectable Colon or Rectal Cancer for a COLOMATE Trial

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This trial screens patients with colon or rectal cancer that has spread to other places in the body (metastatic) or cannot be removed by surgery (unresectable) for genetic mutations for recommendation to a molecularly assigned therapy. Identifying gene mutations may help patients enroll onto target companion trials that target these mutations.

    at UCSD

Our lead scientists for Rectal Cancer research studies include .

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