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Solid Neoplasm clinical trials at UC Cancer
5 research studies open to new patients

  • Gene-Modified T Cells, Vaccine Therapy, and Nivolumab in Treating Patients With Stage IV or Locally Advanced Solid Tumors Expressing NY-ESO-1

    open to eligible people ages 16 years and up

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and the best dose of nivolumab when given together with gene-modified T cells and vaccine therapy in treating patients with solid tumors that express the cancer-testes antigen NY-ESO-1 gene AND have spread from where it started to nearby tissue or lymph nodes (locally advanced) or distant organs (stage IV). T cells are a special type of white blood cells (immune cell) that have the ability to kill cancer cells. Nivolumab may block PD-1 which is found on T cells and help the immune system kill cancer cells. Placing a modified gene for the NY-ESO-1 T cell receptor (TCR) into the patients' T cells in the laboratory and then giving them back to the patient may help the body build an immune response to kill tumor cells that express NY-ESO-1. Dendritic cells are another type of blood cell that can teach other cells in the body to look for cancer cells and attack them. Giving a dendritic cell vaccine with the NY-ESO-1 protein may help dendritic cells teach the immune system to target cancer cells expressing that protein, and further help the T cells attack cancer. Giving nivolumab together with gene-modified T-cells and dendritic cell vaccine may teach the immune system to recognize and kill cancer cells that express NY-ESO-1.

    at UCLA

  • Nanoparticle Albumin-Bound Rapamycin, Temozolomide, and Irinotecan Hydrochloride in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin when given together with temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected or has not responded to treatment. Nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth. Drugs used in chemotherapy, such as temozolomide and irinotecan hydrochloride, work in different ways to stop the growth of tumor cells, either by killing the cells, by stopping them from dividing, or by stopping them from spreading. Giving nanoparticle albumin-bound rapamycin, temozolomide, and irinotecan hydrochloride may work better in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors.

    at UCSF

  • Prexasertib in Treating Pediatric Patients With Recurrent or Refractory Solid Tumors

    open to eligible people ages 12 months to 21 years

    This phase I trial studies the side effects and best dose of prexasertib in treating pediatric patients with solid tumors that have come back after a period of time during which the tumor could not be detected or does not respond to treatment. Checkpoint kinase 1 inhibitor LY2606368 may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for cell growth.

    at UCSF

  • Study of MK-7162 in Combination With Pembrolizumab (MK-3475) in Adult Participants With Advanced Solid Tumors (MK-7162-002)

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    The purposes of this study are to: 1) determine the safety and tolerability of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab (MK-3475), 2) establish a preliminary recommended Phase 2 dose (RP2D) of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab, and 3) assess the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of MK-7162 when administered in combination with pembrolizumab and other therapies to adult participants with advanced solid tumors.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy for sarcomas, Wilms tumor, rare tumors that have come back, did not respond to treatment, or are newly diagnosed

    “How well does targeted therapy, (cabozantinib-s-malate) work in treating younger patients with sarcomas and rare tumors?”

    open to eligible people ages 2-30

    This phase II trial studies how well cabozantinib-s-malate works in treating younger patients with sarcomas, Wilms tumor, or other rare tumors that have come back, do not respond to therapy, or are newly diagnosed. Cabozantinib-s-malate may stop the growth of tumor cells by blocking some of the enzymes needed for tumor growth and tumor blood vessel growth.

    at UCSF UC Davis