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Thyroid Gland Carcinoma clinical trials at UC Cancer
4 research studies open to eligible people

  • Gallium-68 Prostate Specific Membrane Antigen PET in Diagnosing Patients With Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This pilot clinical trial studies how well Gallium-68 prostate specific membrane antigen positron emission tomography (PET) work in diagnosing patients with thyroid cancer. Diagnostic procedures, such as 68Ga-PSMA PET, may more accurately diagnose thyroid cancer and find out how far the disease has spread.

    at UCSF

  • Iodine I-131 With or Without Selumetinib in Treating Patients With Recurrent or Metastatic Thyroid Cancer

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This randomized phase II trial studies how well iodine I-131 works with or without selumetinib in treating patients with thyroid cancer that has returned or has spread from where it started to other places in the body. Many thyroid cancers absorb iodine. Due to this, doctors often give radioactive iodine (iodine I-131) alone to treat thyroid cancer as part of standard practice. It is thought that the more thyroid tumors are able to absorb radioactive iodine, the more likely it is that the radioactive iodine will cause those tumors to shrink. Selumetinib may help radioactive iodine work better in patients whose tumors still absorb radioactive iodine. It is not yet known whether iodine I-131 is more effective with or without selumetinib in treating thyroid cancer.

    at UCSD

  • Lenvatinib and Pembrolizumab in DTC

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II trial studies how well pembrolizumab and lenvatinib work in treating patients with differentiated thyroid cancer that has spread to other places in the body or has come back and cannot be removed by surgery. Immunotherapy with monoclonal antibodies, such as pembrolizumab, may help the body?s immune system attack the cancer, and may interfere with the ability of tumor cells to grow and spread.

    at UCLA

  • Targeted therapy directed by genetic testing in treating patients with advanced solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma

    “Will identifying genetic abnormalities in tumor cells help doctors plan better, more personalized treatment for cancer patients?”

    open to eligible people ages 18 years and up

    This phase II MATCH trial studies how well treatment that is directed by genetic testing works in patients with solid tumors or lymphomas that have progressed following at least one line of standard treatment or for which no agreed upon treatment approach exists. Genetic tests look at the unique genetic material (genes) of patients' tumor cells. Patients with genetic abnormalities (such as mutations, amplifications, or translocations) may benefit more from treatment which targets their tumor's particular genetic abnormality. Identifying these genetic abnormalities first may help doctors plan better treatment for patients with solid tumors, lymphomas, or multiple myeloma.

    at UC Davis UC Irvine UCSD

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